Diana Belohlavek


Building the Guiding Idea in Adults´ Learning Process

The Research on the Ontology of Human Learning developed at The Unicist Research Institute showed that the development of the guiding idea in the learning process of adults is the decisive step to begin the learning process. If there is no clear guiding idea, the learning process does not even start.

The Unicist Ontology of the Guiding Idea of Adults' Learning

The guiding idea of what is being learned is defined by providing an essential answer to the following questions in relation to the object of learning:

What is it?

The definition of the category of the “thing” that needs to be apprehended is the first step to apprehend its nature.

What is it for?

The “What for” of a concept that an adult aims to learn sets the functionality of what is being learned. If the learner truly understands the “what for” of something, the information on this functionality could be used in the future as it would be stored in the long-term memory associated with a concrete use and added value.

What is the differentiation within the category?

Once the essence of an object of learning is apprehended (what is it?) and the functionality of this concept is known (what is it for?), then the individual needs to approach the differentiation of this object of learning with other objects within the same category. Adults are only willing to learn if they know that the solution is “the best of the class”.

 

The Building of the Guiding Idea: The Key to Learning

The building of the guiding idea is the starting point for any learning process. Learning is one of the most freedom oriented actions. No one can truly force anyone to learn, no one can truly stop anyone from learning. For this learning process to take place, the learner makes an individual decision.

When the guiding idea is not defined, the learning does not begin, when the 3 questions are not validated, and are taken as truths, preconcepts and fallacies prevail, but when they are answered and taken in functional terms, a new door opens for the learning of adults.

And as Sun Tzu stated: Every battle is won or lost before it is even fought. The answer given to the essential questions of “What is it?”, “What is for?” and “What is the difference with others in the same category?” define the success or failure of the learning process.


Unicist Conceptual Knowledge Catalyzes Businesses

Operational knowledge unavoidably competes with the knowledge of the participants. Unicist conceptual knowledge widens the field of action and thus provides additional value of aspects that exceed the field of operational work problems.

It necessarily begins being opaque for operational use until people begin to perceive that it is extremely useful to expand the possibilities of businesses and allows multiplying the successful experiences and inhibiting the repetition of failures.

Accessing unicist conceptual approaches requires exposing their logical structures, going beyond intuition, by using a “drop by drop” communication until some of the drops become necessary.

From that moment on the same communication is perceived as a systematic value adding process.

The catalyzing process is produced by the possibility of accessing a superior level of knowledge that provides a logical structured context of an activity. Without this logical structure any superior knowledge is perceived as opaque and unbearable.

This possibility of widening the boundaries is the catalyst in itself.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm. http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist


Active inaction destroys relationships and businesses

Active inaction works as an “ethical business virus” that destroys any productive relationship in organizations. Active inaction is a natural defense in the case of cultures and people who are not able or willing to assume the responsibility for generating added value. It is part of the lifestyle in underdeveloped environments. See:
http://www.unicist.org/complexity-sciences/index.php/unicist-papers-search/4-human-intelligence-and-behavior/52-conceptual-structure-of-active-inaction

Active InactionA paradigmatic trigger for active inaction is “innovation blindness”. People who are affected by “innovation blindness”, need to install the virus of “active inaction” to blame others for what they cannot “see”. See:
http://www.unicist.org/complexity-sciences/index.php/unicist-papers-search/4-human-intelligence-and-behavior/177-conceptual-structure-of-innovation-blindness

It adopts infinite shapes that are driven by the need of avoiding responsibility for results and are sustained by the actions of transferring costs and risks to others.

As it is known, people who do not manage the concepts of what they are doing cannot know what is possible to be achieved. Therefore, they cannot assume the responsibility for producing results.

Active inaction destroys personal relationships in organizations and works as an “ethical business virus” that seeks for the destruction of the ethics of an organization. Those individuals that install this “virus” have the feeling of impunity that is sustained by the fact that “they did nothing”. See:
http://www.unicist.org/complexity-sciences/index.php/unicist-papers-search/8-business-and-institutions/179-conceptual-structure-of-business-viruses

To sustain their impunity, they seek for accomplices in order to demonstrate that their inaction is not their problem, but a problem of the organization. Through this “accomplice pact” the virus can expand instantaneously in organizations.

It needs to be clarified that inaction, in a world that is moving, is an action in itself. It is the unique action that produces an extreme friction provoking the “implosion” of what is being done and the destruction of the ethics of the organization.

All actions, with exception of the “active inaction”, can be “lubricated” in order to have a smooth productive process. It is impossible to support something that is not being done.

That is why “active inaction” is unacceptable in the business world.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
https://www.unicist.org/talents/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/turi.pdf


Unicist Education: The Adults’ learning process in complex adaptive environments

The learning context provides the framework that allows building a guiding idea to begin a learning process. The construction of the guiding idea of learning processes is the first stage to be fulfilled in order to make a learning process begin. Unfortunately, many adults prefer judging instead of assuming the role of a learner. Learning requires a personal decision that cannot be forced because adult people only learn what they need.

Learning ContextThe generation of a guiding idea requires that people are exposed to real value-adding actions and discover that they cannot achieve the necessary results with what they have.

The exposure of individuals to value-adding actions implies two alternative situations:

a) The individual can generate the necessary value.

b) The individual cannot generate it.

If the individual cannot solve the problem, there are two alternatives:

1) The individual is in a comfort zone and is not interested in acquiring a new knowledge to solve the problem.

2) The person needs and wants to learn to solve the problem.

Only the case b) 2) drives to a learning process. The design of learning processes needs to follow the unicist ontology of learning, which defines that, prior to a learning process, an individual needs to be exposed to a meaningful value generation process in order to be able to reflect on that experience and decide to learn or not to learn.

Unavoidably, the learning process in complex environments requires an action-reflection-action process that begins when the guiding idea of the learning objective has been defined. Meaningful guiding ideas sustain the success of learning processes.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm. http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist


Business Hackers: The agents who introduce Business Viruses

Business Hackers are individuals who need to implant business viruses in institutions in order to demonstrate that they are able to dominate them.

They tend to do everything in their way disregarding the use of established methods, procedures and taxonomies to achieve goals.

To introduce viruses they propose short-cuts to achieve profit. Their success is achieved when their proposal is accepted by the greed of their counterparts.

Their butterfly behavior is sustained by conjunctural justifications and the exertion of power. They might use active power or the power of inaction.

Their destruction goal is integrated by envy which is driven by greed and jealousy. They use greed to profit from the environment at a materialistic or emotional level while they feel jealous of the power the organization has.

They are fulfilled when the organizational goals become degraded. They justify their actions by believing and saying that the organization is not such because it could not resist their actions. They are homologous to “computer hackers”.

Inhibiting and entropy-inhibiting unicist business objects are the anti-viruses needed to neutralize their actions.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. https://www.unicist.org/talents/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/turi.pdf

 


DNA of Leadership: Breakthrough in the Research of Behavior

The discovery of the unicist ontological structure describes what can be defined as the genome (DNA) of leadership. The knowledge of its structure and the different categories of leaders allow defining the functionality of the leadership style of an individual and how s/he complements and supplements with others.

Leadership is based on the need to sustain one’s authority. But the participation of others is a condition of leadership. A leader is such because s/he is followed. Therefore, in terms of the unicist logic, participation is the active function of leadership and the energy conservation function is given by the power a leader has to impose her/his authority.

Shared objectives are the driver of leadership. Shared objectives precede the leader’s activity. Exceptions are new groups with no objectives. In this case, a creative leader is needed. Shared objectives are synthesized in the vision of a company or of a group.

Both the creative and the constructive leadership types are functional to develop maximal strategies. Maximal strategies requires democratic, authoritative and exemplarity driven leadership.

Both the authoritarian and the charismatic leadership types are functional to develop minimum strategies. Minimum strategies require a dualistic approach which includes authoritarian, charismatic and laissez faire leadership.

Authoritative paternalistic leadership is the catalyst for minimum strategies. When the catalyst is missing it works as an inhibitor of minimum strategies driving towards failure or inaction.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. https://www.unicist.org/talents/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/turi.pdf 


Value adding: the key for learning processes

Learning processes in adults require the existence of a real problem to be solved. When there is no real problem to be solved, the learning process has no substance and the “knowledge” cannot be stored in the long term memory because it is meaningless.

Learning processes are based on the need to increase the value added to the environment so as to gain a better adaptive position for an individual.

But a learning context is required before a learning process begins.

The maximal strategy of a learning process is given by the need of improvement. The existence of a driver and the real need for improvement provides the will the individual “uses” as a catalyst in order to face and solve the problems of his/her learning process.

Achieving the minimum strategy implies paying the prices to ensure learning. The price to be paid is that the individual needs to leave things aside in order to access the comprehension of a new approach.

Learning implies leaving things aside. If the problem can be solved using the preexisting knowledge there is no need for learning because the problem does not exist. Therefore it is implicit in a learning process for unsolved problems that the individual leaves aside the preexisting approach and enters the comprehension of the new approach without cutting it down to what s/he knew.
Adults only do so when they really need to solve a problem. Improvement is the active function and learning the energy conservation function.

Only people who need to improve will be able to learn. People who enter in a learning process without having a real need to improve in order to solve real problems just enter in self-fulfilling activities.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
https://www.unicist.org/talents/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/turi.pdf


The moral aspects of psychopathic leadership

There are three different drivers of psychopathy: amorality, pseudo-morality and immorality.

A special characteristic of social behavior is that the instinctive behavior is expected to be limited to those aspects that only belong to the intimacy of an individual.

Psychopaths always have a rational justification for their behavior and they need to find it in any of the three drivers of their justified behavior.

  1. Amorality allows using an anti-social cleverness in which the smart-aleck is a paradigmatic example.
  2. Pseudo-morality allows using the justification of anti-social behaviors based on a supposed superior morality for the benefit of the psychopathic moralist.
  3. Immorality allows using the justification of relativist behaviors where the end justifies the means just for the benefit of the psychopath.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist


The Solitude of Power and the Power of Solitude

Leadership implies integrating an existent authority with a necessary participation within the limits of non-exerted power.

The active function of leadership is participation and participation implies being able to exchange with others. Therefore participation is only true when individuals are able to do their part alone and are willing to share.

People who cannot deal with “something” cannot share with others because they have “nothing”. In this case participation becomes a manipulation to avoid assuming the responsibility of what one needs to do alone.

Leadership drives naturally to solitude. Leadership can be exerted if an individual is driven by self-fulfillment and sustained by the power of solitude.

Self-fulfillment implies that a leader is doing something that is meaningful and is part of what s/he loves.

Individuals can do what they love and/or love what they do. Both aspects are part of self-fulfillment. This allows leaders to go beyond existing boundaries and develop maximal strategies.

On the other hand, minimum strategies require that the leader be able to solve the problem for her/himself. To do so leaders need to be able to access their internal power in solitude. Minimum strategies imply assuming the full responsibility for making things happen.

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist


Pleasure is what makes adaptive learning processes possible

In order to be able to learn new skills in the field of adaptive behavior it is necessary that the learning process be sustained by the pleasure obtained from using these skills.

The expectancy of a new pleasant experience and its confirmation during the learning processes is the driver for the learning of new adaptive skills.

The unicist object driven learning process design allowed developing a technology that allows integrating the use of a focused discipline and the achievement of results to provide a pleasant learning experience to the participants. The unicist learning objects are the core of this technology.

Without the expectancy of a new pleasant experience and its confirmation during the learning processes there is no possibility of learning new adaptive skills.

Frequently, adults consider that they know how to learn new skills based on the learning experiences they had in life. This is a fallacy that drives to avoid learning, by transforming the new skills into known fields, eliminating all what is new and adding what is needed to fit into the preexisting knowledge.

That is why the design of adaptive learning processes requires following the natural taxonomic steps that correspond to the subject that is being learned. As it is a field in which the participants have no knowledge, the learners need to have the discipline of following the steps established by the teaching authority.

There are two unpleasant aspects of these learning processes:

1) The learning of the foundations of the new skills in order to be able to integrate them in the long term memory.

2) The exercises to introduce new habits that are necessarily included in the learning processes.

1) New foundations require understanding aspects that are new and do not correspond to the rationality the learner uses to deal with the adaptive aspects of reality. This is painful because it requires leaving convictions aside and building a new structured knowledge of reality.

2) Exercising, which is a necessary aspect of any learning process, is the unpleasant aspect of learning processes. Participants need to develop the exercises which are necessary to introduce new habits knowing that when there is no pain there is no gain, because the individuals have to expand their mental boundaries.

People who avoid the learning of foundations and the exercising cannot learn.

That is why the learning of adaptive skills requires following a “brick by brick” process that allows having a pleasant experience with each brick and a full experience when the bricks are integrated into a building. A metaphor will provide the necessary idea of how this process needs to be built:

http://www.unicist.net/partners-news/unicist-riddles-honoring-bricks/

Diana Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist